Tim Cook says Android has 47 times more malware than iOS

Apple says there are 47 times more malware in circulation on Android than on iOS. According to the California giant, the security of the iPhone is essentially ensured by the assumed monopoly of the App Store, which is the only way to install apps on iOS.

As part of the VivaTech show in Paris, Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, gave an interview to the media Brut. During this interview, the manager once again defended the operating model of iOS, the operating system integrated into the iPhone.

Unlike Android, iOS does not allow you to download and install apps via alternative shops or APKs. To find an app, iPhone users must turn to the App Store, the Apple store.

TIM COOK DÉFEND LE MONOPOLE DE L’APP STORE SUR IPHONE

According to Tim Cook, this small setting is essential to the security of Apple smartphones. “I mean, you look at malware as an example, and Android has 47 times more malware than iOS,” Cook says, citing presumably a report by Nokia in 2019. The study claimed that Google’s OS is responsible for 47% of malware infections detected against less than 1% for iPhone. In 2020, the rate of infections on Android fell to 26.6%. By contrast, iOS rose to 1.7%.

“We designed iOS so that there is only one App Store and all apps are reviewed before entering the store. This prevents a lot of this malware from entering the ecosystem,” says Cook. The framework strongly defends the way iOS works in the face of accusations of monopolies against the App Store. Through the Digital Markets Act (DMA), the European Commission aims to make technology giants more open to competition.

“Customers continually tell us how important this is to them (Editor’s note: security). So we will defend the user in the discussions and we will see where that goes. I’m optimistic, I think most people who are interested in security know that this is a major risk,” says the Apple executive. Despite the pressure, in Europe or in the United States, the giant of Cupertino does not intend to change his policy.

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